Tag Archives: NSU

The New Book Almost Finished!

2018 Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival
The 2018 Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival held in Natchitoches, La. July 20-21, 2018.

I was hoping to have it finished in February but due to a little medical issue that date was delayed, however, I’m now on the last stretch of a middle-grade book I am writing. I was shooting for 35k to 40k words, and I’m at 33,500 right now with the final scene still to come. With any luck I’ll finish it in the next few days and have it edited, the cover done, printed, and be completely ready for the Natchitoches/NSU Folk Festival on July 20-21, 2018. If you’ve never been, it is always great and it is indoors at the Prather Coliseum where it is air conditioned!

Great food, great music, and lots of craftspeople there. Many of the people who make these great crafts are in their twilight years so it’s a fantastic time to meet them, watch them work, and even support them by buying everything from Gumbo file (made by hand) to paintings. There are real bullwhips, jams, jellies, and jewelry!

The festival needs your support to keep this tradition alive!

Of course, I’ll be there signing my books, including the new one, and since my family has been in the Natchitoches area since before there was a Natchitoches, literally, you can drop by my booth and just visit with me and I can point out the best places to visit, to eat, or just to walk around.

Finishing Up New Book

The new book should be with the editor by the end of February at the latest!

The first bunch of books I worked on seemed to fly by, the writing was generally easy and things went pretty smooth even though the publishing on Amazon Kindle and Createspace was still a little glitchy.

However, on the ones I’m working on now, it has been one problem after another.

I decided, after doing a story reading to some kids at the school in Coushatta, La. (with Dr. Shane Rasmussen of the Folklife Center at Northwestern State University ) to do a Middle School – Young Adult book. The fact that at every appearance and festival I’ve attended I’d always been asked if I had any children’s books played a part as well.

As with many of my works, I had the title for a while. The outline of the book popped into my head not long after the visit to the school and, like I usually do, I made some notes and saved them then started writing. In the meantime I would jump from one project to another but always meant to go ahead and wrap up the kids book.

Unfortunately, I had a bit of a health issue which slowed me down for a little while and after that broke my shoulder in two places and banged my head a good one while on vacation. It took a while, a lot longer than when I was young, to heal up and get to the point I could use the keyboard again.

When I finally recovered enough to sit down and get back to work on the book…my notes had disappeared! I still had the first pages I’d written but not my notes. And, apparently the bang to the head had whacked my memory just a little since, for the first time ever, I couldn’t remember how a story I was working on was supposed to progress!

So I’ve spent months now looking for the notes and trying to recreate the ending in my head. Finally, I just decided that it must not have been that good if I’d forgotten and decided to figure out a new storyline using the characters I already had in the book. Once I did that…BANG!!!…a new story appeared and I could use what I’d already written, work in a little mythology,  a little history, and I’m right back on track. Note: this time I made a file with the notes and saved it in several places, plus I wrote it down on a piece of paper.

So by the end of the month I will have (hopefully) finished the first in a new series of books for kids. I won’t tell you the name yet, but I can tell you it has dragons, knights, twin boys named Robert and Anthony (which just happens to be the names of my twin sons) toilets, poo, wizards, and all kinds of other good things!

I’ll announce when it’s ready but it will definitely be completed in paperback for he appearance this summer at the Natchitoches – Northwestern State University Folklife Festival held at the NSU campus on Saturday, July 21, 2018.

If you’ve never been to Natchitoches, Louisiana you should put it on your calendar for this year. It is a beautiful city, the oldest settlement in the Louisiana Purchase, and where numerous movies have been filmed including Steel Magnolias, The Horse Soldiers, and many others. There are gorgeous plantations outside of town, history everywhere, Kisatchie National Forest (the site of the turpentine camp in my first book, The Bottle Tree), and so much more. Plus, it’s a reasonably priced place to visit and the Folklife Festival tickets are a great value! It’s my favorite venue to meet people and sell books.

I should have this book and one other new one ready for this year’s festival, maybe more!

 

Still Writing…Sometimes and Getting the Machinery Ready for Heavy Lifting

The shoulder is still recovering, I can get about two or three good hours of typing each day before it just hurts too badly to continue. I’m 1/3 to 1/2 the way through three books and just getting started on one of the most exciting writing projects I’ve ever done (more about that at another time).

I had to miss the Natchitoches – NSU Folklife Festival in July because it was still in pretty bad shape. I couldn’t autograph books at that point and, even more importantly, I couldn’t carry the boxes of them into the facility. 

In the meantime, Karren has dragged me all over the US in August to see the total eclipse. Apparently to a science geek it is worth the 14+ hours of driving and the heat so you could get an extra 30 seconds of a total eclipse.

Without question it was cool, and it was a “check off” of her bucket list, so it was worth it.

Over the next few weeks I’m going to be posting about some trips we’ve taken, things I remember from the kids growing up, and anything else I can think of to help loosen the writing muscles up again. I was afraid the concussion might have been worse than I originally thought because I lost most of about two or three weeks there and have little gaps still, but I’m back into being able to recover minute trivia quickly and I’m sure I’ll be okay.

So, please bear with me as I get rolling again. I’ll try not to bore you and if you have anything you would like to har about, just let me know!

2015 Natchitoches-NSU Louisiana Folklife Festival

2015-Folk Life Festival

Summer is here and everyone is looking for something fun to do. I'd like to suggest that you consider visiting the 2015 Natchitoches-NSU Louisiana Folklife Festival held in beautiful and historic Natchitoches, Louisiana at the Prather Coliseum on the campus of Northwestern State University. Most of the exhibits (including my booth) are inside the air conditioned coliseum so you can escape the heat and see some great craftsmen, hear good music and try Louisiana foods.

The Folklife Festival is set for July 17th-18th, 2015, and the theme this year is Backroads and Bayous: Celebrating Louisiana's Rural Folklife.

The link to the festival website with the schedule and bands is here.

My wife and I used to visit this every year from when we were first married continuing through when we moved away and then we were lucky enough to be invited to start attending as exhibitors when I started publishing books a number of years ago. The festival is put on by the folks at the Northwestern State University Folklife Center and they do a great job every year. The cost is low and it is well worth the expense plus, if you've never been to Natchitoches, it's a great time to visit my hometown.

Natchitoches is the oldest settlement in the Louisiana Purchase, founded in 1714, just a short distance from the location of the festival.

If you do decide to attend be sure and stop by my booth and visit with me. I'll have books there for sale but I like to visit with everyone whether they purchase or not and my family has lived in the Natchitoches are since its founding. I've actually been learning about its history since I was a very, very small child through the stories my relatives told in addition to the enormous number of hours I've spent doing formal research so I can probably point you to some interesting places that most people don't know about as well as the more touristy ones. My kids can tell you that no matter where you are in Natchitoches Parish I can probably point in a direction and tell you something fun or historic not far away (much to their boredom at times).

Anyway, it really is a great festival and Dr. Shane Rasmussen and his staff are working hard to preserve the Louisiana culture and heritage, focusing on not just the bayous and swamps of the southern part of the state or New Orleans. 

The Louisiana Studies Conference at NSU – Natchitoches

For the third year I was invited to, and did, speak at the Louisiana Studies Conference at my undergraduate alma mater Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La.

Before I discuss it I wanted to give a big thanks to all of the people involved in putting on the conference. Dr. Shane Rasmussen, the Director of the Louisiana Folklife Center, has made great efforts in developing the Folklife Center and is responsible not only for this conference but also the Folklife Festival held each summer. Although he will be the first to admit that he couldn't do it without the assistance of many others including Shelia Thompson from the Folklife Center. Dr. Lisa Abney, the Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs as well as a Professor of English at NSU is also a co-chair of the seminar and a frequent speaker and/or moderator at the conference. There are many, many more people involved than I have mentioned but I wanted to be sure and name these three.

I've been to a number of legal continuing education seminars and writers conferences and have never seen one where things go as smoothly as the Louisiana Studies Conference.

The conference seems to be growing in size as well but I would really like to see more of the public turn out for this. The topics are always interesting, you can see this year's program brochure and topics at this link, and since it is free to the general public it is an opportunity that is being missed by many.

If any of my readers are interested in the conference or any other information please feel free to email me and I will be glad to discuss it with them and I'll even send them a reminder next year when the info for the conference is released.  In addition to the conference being great it is held on the Northwestern State University campus so those people attending can also take the opportunity to visit Natchitoches, the oldest city in the Louisiana Purchase (300 years old this year) and a city founded by an ancestor of mine, Louis Juchereau de St. Denis.

Dr. Rasmussen announced that the theme for next year's conference is "Louisiana: A Cultural Crossroads", paying homage to the El Camino Real as well as the Mississippi and Red Rivers which provided water passages from the northern areas to the Gulf of Mexico.

As soon as he announced the theme an idea for my talk next year, as well as a paper for the Louisiana Folklife Journal, popped into my head.  So next year the tentative title for my presentation will be  "Voodoo, Hoodoo and the Blues", which should be very interesting to research and write and, since I'll have a lot of blues music as a part of the presentation, should be fun for the people who attend. 

A Great Movie – Winter’s Bone

Winter's Bone

Last week I was in Natchitoches for the NSU Louisiana Folklife Studies Conference and the storms rolled through on Friday night and knocked out the power for several hours. I had my Kindle Fire with me and had downloaded a movie, Winter's Bone, onto it and so I decided to watch it while the power was out.

I first started watching the movie last year on Netflix but I only watched a few minutes and Netflix pulled it before I had a chance to finish watching. I bought it on Amazon Instant Video and had just never gotten around to finishing it. I was absolutely blown away by the story and the actors.

Jennifer Lawrence got an Oscar nomination for her role as Ree Dolly and this movie, more than anything else she has played in shows what kind of acting chops she has. John Hawkes, who is one of the most underrated actors around, plays her uncle Teardrop and is phenomenal.

The movie is bleak and depressing, mostly because it is such an accurate portrayal of the life many "poor folks" lead and particularly now that meth has seized control of rural America. I was especially struck by film because I had just been reading about several arrests that had taken place in a very, very small country town where I had went to school.

Jennifer Lawrence's character is forceful and determined, looking out for her family and their home at the risk of her own well being.

The movie was a very low grossing film, one of the lowest grossing ever to be nominated for Best Picture. I can see why it wasn't a box office hit. I can also see why some people don't care for it but if you truly like good writing and a good movie then Winter's Bone is for you.