Category Archives: Noah Chance Series

I Was Wondering When I’d Get this Question…

Everyone who knows me knows that I’m from Louisiana, I lived in NOLA for a while,  and I used to visit NOLA at least once a year. My best friend and I would go down every year for a long weekend of carousing, eating, and to catch a football game.

In No’ Chance, the first book in the Noah Chance Series, the ultimate battle takes place in New Orleans, one of my top three cities in the world. In that battle, one of the “bad guys” is wearing an Atlanta Falcons helmet.

I was recently asked if I chose the Atlanta Falcons at random, because they’re in the same division as the Saints or if there is another reason.

This is one of the few easy questions my readers ask and the answer is, I have been a New Orleans Saints fans for as long as there has been a New Orleans Saints Team. I remember watching parts of games in their first year of playing and then I’ve watched every year since then, even in the paper bag years.

I made one of the bad guys an Atlanta Falcons fan because you can’t be a Saints fan and not dislike the Falcons.  It’s nothing against the city of Atlanta, the Falcons could move somewhere else and I’d still root against them. I don’t shop at Home Depot since learning the owner, Arthur Blanks, also owns Home Depot.  I never liked Deion Sanders and while I can tolerate Julio Jones, I have no doubt his performance would increase if he was with another team.

So, yes, the bad guy was an Atlanta Falcons fan simply because they should never be permitted with the city limits of New Orleans.

I remember on one trip to NOLA where we met up with a contingent of Carolina Panthers fans and had a good time at the game and then afterward.  Of course, that was in the days before Cam Newton but still, overall, the Panthers fans are alright.

So to Falcons fans, I appreciate you buying my books and that shows excellent taste on your part and if you ever want to be a Saints fan you’re welcome to join the ranks.

And now, for the best commercial ever on the Saints-Falcons rivalry:


Oh yes and 28-3!

 

A Life Experience – Mardi Gras, Ash Wednesday and Leaving New Orleans

Some of my earlier posts have been lost over the years (thanks to crappy security at GoDaddy hosting) and this one came to mind because 1) the family is all working on their bucket lists and 2) today is Ash Wednesday.

New Orleans, La. Mardi Gras Parade

When I go to book signings and conferences, the most common question I’m asked,  like most writers, is “Where do you get New Orleans, La. Mardi Gras Paradeyour ideas?” I always tell people it’s because of something I’ve seen or done somewhere which triggered the initial idea. In No’ Chance, the first book in the Noah Chance series, you’ll notice the heroes of the book end up in New Orleans, one of my favorite cities in the world. The places I talk about in the book are real, and to make it as authentic as possible I even try to get the addresses, directions, number of blocks, etc. all correct.

I lived in New Orleans when I was a kid and so Mardi Gras isn’t a new thing for me. However, several years ago Karren and I were invited to go back with some friends of ours (Thanks Jack and Denise!) .

As long as you don’t get claustrophobic in crowds and understand NOLA culture and people then everybody should do Mardi Gras in New Orleans at least once in their life.  There are a lot of places that celebrate it, Galveston and Jefferson, Tx.,

New Orleans, LA, Mardi Gras Indians. Look for them on Mardi Gras day or Super Sunday.

Mobile, Al., and Mamou, La. are several cities which come to mind, each with their own twist.

However, the most famous Mardi Gras is in the Crescent City and nobody does it like them. There are several different parades on different days, there are the Mardi Gras Indians in the Zulu Parade, and so many other things it’s impossible to cover them all.

This last time we wrapped up our trip on Fat Tuesday and watched the New Orleans Police come through and “clear the streets” at midnight, a time honored tradition, and left the next day on Ash Wednesday.

While leaving we took a couple of turns to try and avoid some traffic and ended up in the Treme District, the front vehicle following a “street funeral”. While it added a while onto the trip, my wife and I couldn’t miss this and so we watched the procession make its way down the street, with the Treme Brass Band playing music as they marched.  This was truly one for the bucket list.

If you don’t understand most of what I’ve talked about in this post, it’s because you’re not familiar with New Orleans and I’d suggest you read up a little and even watch the Treme series from HBO. Of course, I’d also suggest you give No’ Chance a read since there’s a lot of history and culture in there as well.

In the meantime, here’s a video showing them playing in the HBO series. The same song, the same band, in the same neighborhood. When I find the video I shot with my phone I’ll post it as well:

 

World War 1, Flanders Fields, and Second Chance

While I’m working on the new books, I’m going to be discussing the ones that have already been released, since often the questions I get from the books clubs and fans are about what is already out there.

The Noah Chance series consists of two books at this point, with a third in the pre-planning stages now. These books are about a remarkable young man with Downs Syndrome who, in Second Chance, has just graduated High School.

As many of you know I actually started writing No’ Chance, the first book in the series, back in the mid to late 90s. I’d write a paragraph here and a paragraph there, mostly when I was on the road trying to establish myself as a trial lawyer. Then, on an absolutely beautiful late summer day, I was waiting on the members of a jury we’d picked to arrive at the courthouse so we could start a trial and the judge called the lawyers back into her office and waved at her television and we saw the world changing before our eyes and suddenly many things that had seemed scary were not quite so scary anymore as we watched the World Trade Center buildings fall to the ground over the next while.

Trial lawyers spent the next couple of years trying to figure out how the events of that day and what followed would affect the viewpoints of the jurors and I found my time for writing was even more limited.

By the time I was ready to release No’ Chance, I was already well into writing Second Chance, and it seemed we had been at war with someone, somewhere, forever. I had always been fascinated by the stories told to me by veterans of WW II but when I started reading about WW I  the realization hit that what was called The War to End Wars had probably been as horrible as any before or after and yet you didn’t hear much about it. That’s particularly interesting when you consider we’re not in the 10 year anniversary of it happening. 

I said all that to say this, a part of that war made it into Second Chance, a book set in the beautiful locale of Galveston Island, Texas, a place I knew well since I had visited there every weekend for many of the summers of my early life and as far removed from the WW I torn landscape of Flanders as it was possible to be.

The Noah Chance series are each standalone novels, but I strongly suggest you read them in order. Just as I was growing as a writer, so the characters grew as people and sometimes a few lines of a letter home or, in this case, a poem from a young doctor who had been at Flanders after the battle, did a lot to depict the horror of war.

I’m closing out this post, as I periodically do, with a YouTube video. This one is The Bloody Fields of Flanders, played on bagpipes. While some say that bagpipes sounds to them like a bag of cats being strangled, many of us feel a stirring in our soul when the keening starts, showing that while out family may be generations from the green hills of Scotland, the blood still runs true.

Sometimes It’s Hard to Break a Bad Habit

There's been an article floating around Facebook the last few days and it prompted me to write this post. The article is at this link and is the response of a Special Olympian to one of the nasty social media posts by Ann Coulter. 

I try not to get too political on my own author blog, I do write for political blogs and those who know me know my political leanings. If you want to know I'm more than happy to discuss them with you but unless it has something to do with my writing, this website wasn't built to be a political site and really isn't the place for me to discuss these matters.

I do think Ann Coulter is a vile person and, even worse, a horrible writer who makes up facts to fit her viewpoint in the supposedly non-fiction books she writes. To me, this is unforgivable just from the intellectual honesty point of view.

But I digress once again.

The young man, John Franklin Stephens, saw a post where Coulter used the term "retard" when referring to someone. John has Down (or Down's) Syndrome and responded in a way that was as classy as it was possible to be. 

As my readers know, Noah Chance, of my books series of the same name, has Down's Syndrome and exhibits many of the same characteristics of John Franklin Stephens. As I've mentioned before, Noah was loosely based on a client I once represented and the first person with Down's Syndrome I had the good fortune to actually get to know.

Unfortunately, I still find myself using the term "retard" or "retarded", when referring to the actions of someone, without thinking about it. I do my best not to use it and I don't actually refer to people with Down's Syndrome that way but the term is still one I wish I could strike from my vocabulary. 

But it's hard to do.  If only good habits were as easy to develop as bad habits are hard to break.

If you get a minute, read the article and see how class really works.